Where does Royalty Claim's data come from?

Dae Bogan
By
Dae Bogan
in
Research
August 12, 2017

Question: Where does Royalty Claim's data come from?

Answer: Many places.

Royalty Claim Initiative researchers and data scientists locate, retrieve, synthesize and ingest an array of published and unpublished data that reference statutory notifications of certain music licenses, unattributed royalties (so-called "Black Box" royalties) and settlements; and income participants (payees) in undistributed royalties that stem from collective bargaining agreements, international reciprocal agreements, statutory royalties, and more. We also analyze data related to music consumption (e.g. downloads, streams, sales), broadcasts, performances, and other types of data to identify trends from which we can interpret insights into the global music licensing ecosystem.

The following is just a sample of the types of royalty funds in which we are interested:

United States Royalty Funds - Payee as Featured Artists (Recording Artist, Orchestra Soloist(s), Orchestra Conductor, Orchestra Group, Orchestra Contractors, Underscore Conductor, A/V Sound Recording Artists):
  • Digital Audio Recording Technology - Sound Recordings Fund - Artists Sub Fund
  • Foreign Hometaping, Rental, and Lending Royalties
  • Digital Radio Royalties Fund - Artist Sub Fund
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - US Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Audiovisual Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Audiovisual Division - Foreign Royalties
United States Royalty Funds - Payee as Musical Work Copyright Owner (e.g. Publisher, Songwriter):
  • Digital Audio Recording Technology - Musical Works Fund - Publishers Sub Fund
  • Harry Fox Agency - Compulsory Mechanical Royalties
  • Music Reports Inc. - Compulsory Mechanical Royalties
  • Loudr - Compulsory Mechanical Royalties
  • ASCAP - Public Performance Royalties - Publishers Sub Fund
  • ASCAP - Digital Audio Recording Technology - Musical Works Fund - Writers Sub Fund
  • ASCAP - Public Performance Royalties - Writers Sub Fund
  • BMI - Public Performance Royalties - Publishers Sub Fund
  • BMI - Digital Audio Recording Technology - Musical Works Fund - Writers Sub Fund
  • BMI - Public Performance Royalties - Writers Sub Fund
  • SESAC - Public Performance Royalties - Publishers Sub Fund
  • SESAC - Digital Audio Recording Technology - Musical Works Fund - Writers Sub Fund
  • SESAC - Public Performance Royalties - Writers Sub Fund
United States Royalty Funds - Payee as Film & Television Musicians:
  • Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund
  • Live Television Videotape Supplemental Markets Fund
United States Royalty Funds - Payee as Non-featured Artist (Background Vocalists, Session Musicians, AV Session Musicians, Underscore Instrumental or Vocal Performers):
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - US Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Sound Recording Division - US Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Sound Recording Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Sound Recording Special Payments Fund
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Audiovisual Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Audiovisual Division - Foreign Royalties
United States Royalty Funds - Payee as Sound Recording Copyright Owner (e.g. Record Company, Independent Recording Artist):
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - US Royalties
  • Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund - Symphonic Royalties Division - Foreign Royalties
  • Digital Audio Recording Technology - Sound Recordings Fund - Sound Recording Copyright Owner Sub Fund
  • Foreign Hometaping, Rental, and Lending Royalties
  • Digital Radio Royalties Fund - SRCO Sub Fund

This list represents only a sample of the royalty funds that currently exist in the United States. There are many, many more that we are interested in around the world. Royalty Claim does has not currently retrieve data from all of these funds, however it is our ongoing mission to partner with each of the fund administrators to receive this data and make it available to the public via the Royalty Claim Platform. In addition, this list does not include the hundreds of so-called "Black Box" royalty funds that currently exists in the United States and around the world. A black box is an escrow fund in which music royalties are held due to an organization’s inability to attribute the royalties earned to the appropriate payee. 

"Black boxes materialize for many reasons, including but not limited to: the inability to identify rights holders despite payments made for the use of their compositions; the lengthy time required for filing domestic and ultimately international copyrights, often begun only when a recording is actually released; multiple claims for the same rights exceeding 100% of ownership, resulting in indefinite disputes; international collaborations with less than all creators asserting their rights; international legal inconsistencies regarding what type of performances result in payments (most visible in the fact that [terrestrial] radio play does not generate royalties for recording artists in the United States); and the slow and often manual processes to report usage and clear payments under international reciprocal agreements." (1)

The collective global Black Box has been estimated to be valued between $1 billion and $3 billion with as much as $100 million in streaming mechanical royalties trapped in the black boxes of various interactive streaming services.

The Royalty Claim Data Ingestion Diagram below provides a high-level view of data sources currently available in the Royalty Claim Platform. Our sources and the data will continue to grow over time.

Click to view Royalty Claim's Data Ingestion Diagram
  1. Sellin, Derek & Seppälä, Timo (6.2.2017). “Digital Music Industry – Background Synthesis”. ETLA Working Papers No 48. http://pub.etla.fi/ETLA-Working-Papers-48.pdf
Dae Bogan

Dae Bogan is a serial entrepreneur, educator, consultant, researcher, writer, public speaker, and business advisor interested in music rights, metadata, financial pipelines, transparency, interoperability and collaboration within the greater music industry. He is the Founder & Chief Researcher of Royalty Claim, a music licensing research initiative and an online database of music licensing entitlements. He is also the Founder & CEO of TuneRegistry, a music and rights metadata management platform.

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